Favourite Wine

Chasplaya
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Sat Sep 19, 2009 12:48 am

Whilst I am parochial about NZ wines,in particular most NZ Pinot Noirs or even a nice cooled PInot Gris on a hot balmy NZ day. I have found a very el cheapo but very drinkable South African Pinotage Obikwa is the name. SO price is not everything.


BigBear
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Sat Sep 19, 2009 1:09 am

TGMatt wrote:
Has anyone mentioned Grange Hermitage ??..

Grange is in a league with the great French first grwoth wines like Latour, Lafite, Margaux, Haut Brion, Mouton and Petrus and priced accordingly. I've only had it twice and it is spectacular but it is so powerful it needs years to even become approachable.

When I win the lottery I'll definately have a few cases of Grange in my cellar!

Matt, what you are referring to was the French Blight of Phylloxera that occurred between 1858 to 1863. This root louse wiped out over 40% of all the vines in France. It was discovered that the root stocks from California were resistant to Phylloxera so the French basically replanted the whole country between 1870 and 1890 by grafting French vines on American rootstock.

What is particularly interesting is that many/most American vineyards are no longer planted on resistant root stocks and Phylloxera is becoming a big problem again, especially in Oregon where I live. Apparently, we didn't learn our history lesson from the French and therefore we appear doomed to repeat it.

I owned a small vineyard until a couple of years ago and no one planted on resistant root stocks because they were prohibitively expensive and virtually impossible to buy because there was no demand for them. As long as no one brings the little bastards into your vineyard you're fine but when they hit, it is only a matter to time before the vines wither and you have to replant. Then you lose 5-7 years of income while paying out astronomical money for the entire rip-out and replant process. Lots of fun!

:cheer:


Chasplaya
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Sat Sep 19, 2009 1:25 am

Reading up on American Wine history is really interesting. The natives vines apparently were not very successful and they crossed the native vine with French ones whihc had more success in Ohio. The Prohibition spoiled the industry and when Prohibition was repealed the best vintners had died and the skill had to be essentially relearned that plus the tastes for wine had significanlyt changed and the demand was for real el cheapo dago red wine.. I have several books on Wine and its origins. French German and American wines are quite interconnected due to the various diseases and black rot problems over the years.


NKenny
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Sat Sep 19, 2009 7:27 am

My wife and I go to any local winery whenever we travel. As far as my favorite ,that's a hard one. One of my favorite wineries is Brotherhood it is right here in New York state. It is Americas oldest winery and I love their Riesling. Hmmmm, I guess I'll go grab my guitar and a glass right now. What more could one want guitar, wine and TG

Kenny


d_dog
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Tue Feb 16, 2010 5:47 pm

Matt, I'm loving me some Malbec as well. Have you ever had the Argintina 07 Catena Zapata Malbec? It's not $4 but it's good. Also a little closer to home, the Maryhill Winery in Oregon, near the Dalles on the Columbia River makes a really nice Malbec. Check it out here: Maryhill Malbec
We spent the weekend in Seattle this weekend and did a wine tour downtown, had some great wine and learned a lot, fantastic day!


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