All over the road

s2welee
Posts: 0
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 3:51 am
Status: Offline

Mon Apr 13, 2009 9:06 pm

I am pretty new to the guitar, about 6 months total. I feel like I am getting better, but I am finding it hard to focus in on any single thing. I jump around trying to learn different songs and only mastering a couple of strumming songs. Chalk it up to a short attention span.

Long and short of the question, are professional lessons worth it? I have books, videos and this site, but I cannot seem to get on track. My thought is that at least I would have something to work on week to week with someone objective to gauge progress. Just a bit frustrated.

-Whit


Chasplaya
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:41 pm
Status: Offline

Mon Apr 13, 2009 9:23 pm

IMHO you can't beat face to face lessons, just be choosy though about who you pick


bhudson
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 10:45 pm
Status: Offline

Mon Apr 13, 2009 10:55 pm

Hi Whit, I am in the same situation as you are. I just picked up a guitar in Dec 2008. I am 44. I did the same thing, try a few songs, learned some intros and not finish complete songs. I decided to start over from scratch. I practiced the following chords c,em,d,g,am, I have now concentrated on 1 song, Neil Young's Heart of Gold. Its a very easy song to do and in almost a week I can play 75%. I too found it frustrating. Keep at one song, go for easy and you wont get frustrated. I plan on taking lessons in the fall due to sports related commitments. I have picked up my guitar almost every night since I got it (5 Months) Now that I have stuck to 1 song, i see improvement. My buddy who is a very good Guitar player said to me that you will get to a point that you will think that you are not improving or that you cant get any better, but you can. My wife says that I am getting better each day and I almost believe her!! Keep on Strumming!! Brad


haoli25
Posts: 0
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 7:06 am
Status: Offline

Tue Apr 14, 2009 9:10 am

Brad and Whit, you guys are on the right track, hang in there. Find a good teacher in your area. Ask for references from the schools and ask all the guitar pickers in your area for suggestions. Take your time and find the right teacher for you.
And last, but not least, remember this, Stevie Ray Vaughn once said, "The best thing about playing guitar is that I am still learning." As are we all. Good luck to you both and keep pickin'.

Bill


thereshopeyet
Posts: 71
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:19 pm
Status: Offline

Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:38 am

When I was a teenager and just learning I thought I could learn on my own--all my favorite guitarists did (I don't remember reading that Clapton, Hendrix, Richards, or any of the old blues guys ever took formal lessons). However, I did find myself getting frustrated that I wasn't progressing enough and was unable to learn most songs by ear. I finally broke down and took 13 months of lessons from Neil. I also realized that while many of these legendary guitarists did not officially take lessons, they did hang out with other guitarists and were able to learn from and share with them. At minimum, take a few lessons from a reputable teacher who can teach the style(s) you like and see how it goes...


Valleyguy
Posts: 0
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:49 pm
Status: Offline

Tue Apr 14, 2009 2:50 pm

Certainly, if you can't stay focused on one or two songs and master them to your level of ability, then a teacher would certainly give you that discipline. I believe the guitar is 10% teaching 90% practice. When the practice becomes fun, then you've arrived.

I know doing repetitve drills or riffs can get old and you feel you're getting nowhere, but stick to it. Learning isn't a gradual rising curve, it happens in steps. All of sudden you'll find you can more easily do things.


Good luck, keep it up.


dustystrings
Posts: 0
Joined: Thu Mar 19, 2009 3:41 am
Status: Offline

Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:15 am

I picked up a guitar for the first time when I was in High School, I wanted to impress a girl ;). I learned the intro to "Stairway to Heaven", probably not the best to start with but it worked. That was over 30 years ago. I now know dozens of chords, scales, patterns, riffs, and licks. I regularly jam with others and have fun, we even play once or twice a month at a local Irish Pub. I can play hundreds of songs (a few even the correct way). My problem is I have yet to take a face to face lesson and I now have 30 years of bad habits and lazy techniques because I didn't think I needed a teacher. Hindsight is 20/20. At the very least, work with an instructor to learn the basics, ie: posture, form, pick handling, left hand placement, etc. And a little theory will go a long ways. You will be much better in the long run.


js0606
Posts: 0
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:32 am
Status: Offline

Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:13 am

Hey, just from my recent experience...

If you have a college/university in your area and probably even a community college, check with them about lessons. I'm taking lessons at my local university in their "Informal Class". It's a 10 week course, once a week for an hour and the total cost was 95.00!!

A low cost choice and you can decide whether future lessons are needed/desired.

When we had lessons for my son from a private teacher, we were paying 85.00 a month for 4 - 1 hour classes. Much more expensive.

Good Luck!
another beginner at 47!!
Jamie


s2welee
Posts: 0
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 3:51 am
Status: Offline

Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:39 pm

Thanks for all the advice guys. I am focusing on one song right now as recommended in this thread. I have decided to work on the Ripple lesson Neil has posted. I am also looking at options for lessons, but time is so tight with the two kids...we shall see.

-Whit


Mike59
Posts: 0
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:55 pm
Status: Offline

Fri Apr 17, 2009 9:35 am

Something that seems to work for me when I start to get frustrated with learning a particular song is put the song away for a few days. When I go back to it, the muscle memory seems to have kicked in and I play it better. My subconscious is far more talented than my objective mind.


Post Reply Previous topicNext topic