New electric guitar

BigBear
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Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:16 pm

I have a Gibson Les Paul Studio just to keep my acoustics from ganging up on me!! I'm convinced that the neck on an electric is what makes the guitar. If you like sleek, fast necks the Strats and Telies are great. The Les Paul and it's copies have a bulkier neck that some players swear by.

Because electrics really don't do anything until they are plugged in the pickups are important too. Some people love humbuckers others less so, so listen to your final choices through whatever amp you will be using. I'm convinced that almost any guitar you like will work once it is crunched, overdriven and distorted.

$800 is a lot of money if you haven't played much electric. I'd suggest finding a good used guitar under your budget, see if it plays like you want to play and then upgrade to an $800 ax later. I bought my Les Paul used but in new condition on eBay for $650 from a reputable guitar shop. Then paid $40 to have my local luthier set it up right for me. Unless, I decide to go to an American Strat ($1,300 - $1,400) I'm happy with it.

Happy Playin'!!


bigkidz
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Sat May 02, 2009 12:01 pm

Actually BigBear there are some Les Paul models that have slimmer necks, the Classic model was made to reproduce the 1960 Les Paul guitar. I own several Les Paul models and they all play different. One of the very fat neck Les Pauls was refretted by Tom Doyle who does work on the real Les Paul guitars, I live pretty close to Les and know his grand kids, and the fat necked Les Paul is very easy to play because of how it is set up. My advice is to play every guitar before you buy it to see how you like it. All 2009 American Strats do not play alike or 2009 Les Paul Standards. You really have to play each guitar. You also have to know what sound you are looking for to decide on what brand guitar you want.


Tintin
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Tue May 05, 2009 1:23 pm

Sometimes, used are better than new if they come from a trusted source 'cause they've been tested out and perhaps "improved" (modified) from their stock state with better tuners, pick ups, wiring, capacitors, etc..


BigBear
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Wed May 06, 2009 12:32 am

bigkidz wrote:
Actually BigBear there are some Les Paul models that have slimmer necks...
Excellent point and of course you are correct. I was trying to simplify by generalizing and make the point that certain guitars are known by certain characteristics. I think I generalized too far!

I've played many Les Pauls but don't have nearly your background. Compared to Strats they all seems to have a fatter neck or maybe a different shape. I know many players swear by Les Paul necks but they are different "generally" from Strats, PRS, etc.

The very best advice is always to play them all and pick the one that sings to you!!


Tintin
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Wed May 06, 2009 9:33 am

It's best to try a few out. I own a Telecaster, Stratocaster, and 2 Les Pauls, and they all are quite different from each other.


Music Junkie
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Wed May 06, 2009 1:12 pm

Yeah, test driving is the best way to go. Just keep in mind that a lot of the tone you would look for comes from your amp as well. With today's amps, you can get just about any tone you are looking for. You can find shredder guitars playing jazz with the right type of amp and settings. Don't get too caught up in brand names and styles (although they do have their place). Like everyone has said, try out as many as you can. Also, while trying them out, try each one on a few different amps to see what you can get out of them. I have an old Fender Strat that I replaced the single coil pick-ups on with some stacked Tom Anderson humbuckers. I then put in a switch to cut the humbucking, giving it a more single coil type of sound. It gives a pretty broad range of tone like that. Then throw in an amp with tons of different settings, and you can play a wide variety of genres. You might think about spending some of the $800 on a versatile amp as well. Just a thought.

Good luck!

MJ


kelly454
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Sun May 10, 2009 5:15 pm

For your type of genre a Les Paul style guitar would be a good fit. A guitar is like is like a fine woman though. You have to go through many of them to find the right one for you. When trying them out check the action, how your hands feel around the neck, How comfortable is it to strum and so forth. Once you have one that feels right, then check intonation and different pick up settings.

If you already have an amp, ask if you can bring it in to plug into to make sure the guitar is going to give you what you desire. Going thru the guitars is so important because they are all different in one way or another this is especially true in the price range you are looking in.


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